In-House Interior Design

One of the pitfalls of having an in-house interior design person or small group within the office staff for a high-end custom homebuilder…is that if many of the architectural decisions and most of the interior design decisions are managed from within the homebuilding company…the homebuilder then also owns the myriad of “internal” RFI’s (requests for information)…which if not addressed in an organized and systematic way can quickly snowball into questions and issues that delay construction operations in the field.

The standard, arms-length arrangement of owner/architect/general contractor divides up the varied duties, roles, and responsibilities into relatively clear lines of demarcation.  Questions from the construction regarding the design plans…or requests for missing information in the plans and specifications…which arise during the course of the construction…are handled through RFI’s from the general contractor to the architect and/or structural engineer, for example…which are then individually monitored for timely response by the general contractor.

RFI’s which have not been answered that might adversely affect the construction schedule are communicated to the owner…often during the weekly owner/builder meeting…the owner then contacting the appropriate design professional regarding the particular question or issue.

The point here is that if the owner (“spec” homebuilder and/or custom homebuilder) is also generating a large portion of the architectural information…moving walls, changing layout, moving interior doors, etc., and all of the interior design information (prior to finding a homebuyer or in coordination with a homebuyer)…then the owner/homebuilder and the designer…parties one and two in the standard arrangement described above…become combined into one unit and there is no outside entity to send questions to other than internally to itself.

The procedure of sending an RFI to the design team and expecting a prompt reply…no longer exists.

In this arrangement…which seems on the surface to be beneficial in some areas such as keeping the artistic decisions consistent with the opinions of the homebuilder and his or her in-house staff…and the ability to better control the homebuyer client without the influence of a third-party, outside interior designer having contrary opinions…must be accompanied by a serious and thorough internal system of policies, procedures, control spreadsheets, and regularly scheduled office staff meetings to insure that field questions are being answered as quickly as they would otherwise be if sent out to an outside design team of the architect and engineers.

Author: Barton Jahn

I worked in building construction as a field superintendent and project manager. I have four books published by McGraw-Hill on housing construction (1995-98) under Bart Jahn, and have eight Christian books self-published through Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). I have a bachelor of science degree in construction management from California State University Long Beach. I grew up in Southern California, was an avid surfer, and am fortunate enough to have always lived within one mile of the ocean. I discovered writing at the age of 30, and it is now one of my favorite activities. I am currently working on more books on building construction.

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